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Friday, March 31, 2006

Industry condemns 'misleading' forestry claims. 01/04/2006. ABC News Online

Industry condemns 'misleading' forestry claims. 01/04/2006. ABC News Online

The Tasmanian timber industry has hit back at the Wilderness Society's claims logging activity in southern Tasmania's Florentine Valley is destroying high conservation value forest.

Timber Communities Australia has accused the Wilderness Society and the Greens of misleading the public.

The Wilderness Society says Prime Minister John Howard has broken a promise to protect 18,700 hectares of old-growth forest in the Styx and Florentine valleys.

Spokesman Geoff Law says the logging industry is getting $250 million through the Community Forest Agreement.

"With these millions and millions of dollars being poured down the throat of the Tasmanian logging industry, why is it that we are still losing key areas of old-growth forest?" he said.

Timber Communities Australia says the areas are not that significant.

It says a 1989 report compiled by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature affirms logging on the World Heritage boundary would not diminish the area's values.
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Monday, March 27, 2006

Danes to get huge hit of princess's home turf [25mar06]

The Mercury: Danes to get huge hit of princess's home turf [25mar06]

A PANORAMIC oil painting of the view from northern Bruny Island will wrap around an entire room of Frederiksborg Castle in Denmark next month.

The 30m oil painting by Monash University fine arts lecturer Ann Holt will be part of the Australian Visit exhibition in Copenhagen, to be opened by Princess Mary and featuring a portrait of her.

Ms Holt's impressive artwork is expected to be of great interest to Danes, as it includes the D'Entrecasteaux Channel area where Mary grew up.

"I now get to share these heart-felt paintings - of a very beautiful, special, quiet place - in a castle on the other side of the world," Ms Holt said.

"For me the really exciting thing is that I get to show my interpretation of the Tasmanian landscape to an international audience."









Ms Holt, of Melbourne, completed Circumnavigating the Island as part of her Master of Fine Arts at Monash. She spends a great deal of time living and painting on Bruny Island.

Circumnavigating the Island, comprising 30 seperate panels, has previously been featured in the 10 Days on the Island festival and on ABC's Arts Show.

It shows the mouth of the River Derwent, Storm Bay and the D'Entrecasteaux Channel.

Ms Holt said she tried to capture Tasmania's multi-layered landscape.

"I've been going there for 10 years; I've done a lot of plain air painting of all the different views and I've got a very intimate engagement with that landscape," she said.

"Tasmania is incredibly beautiful but very dangerous and dark at times. It has all these incredible moods and it has this sense of power that a lot of landscapes have lost through over-urbanisation."

She will be in Copenhagen for the exhibition opening in the Danish Museum of National History in Frederiksborg Castle on April 7.

The exhibition runs until July 31.

Sunday, March 26, 2006

John Howard's sphincter

Although I'm going beyond Tassie's borders and into the realm of off-shore issues I thought I must make these observations.

Who said this recently?

“My government co-operated fully with the Volcker oil-for-food inquiry”.

Yep -- it was our PM

Now let's re-run the video-clip that captured John Howard's words -- and this time, watch the body language. There's the white-knuckle grip on the lectern, and thanks to the camera's oblique angle, we get to see a very nervous pelvic squirm. If the sphincterometer had been connected, it would have gone off-scale.

Monday, March 20, 2006

Think global : Nature

Think global : Nature

location based services



'Virtual globe' software is transforming our ability to visualize and hypothesize in three dimensions. Educators take note.

Millions of people across the world are zooming in from space, flying across continents, and swooping over mountains and through cities, thanks to Google Earth, NASA's World Wind and other free virtual globes.

The ability to model the Earth in exquisite three-dimensional detail was previously only approached on the desktops of professional users of geographical information systems (GIS). But even they were unable to publish high-resolution globes on the Internet, because of the sheer volume of the data — a globe with a resolution of one metre would take years to download using even a fast Internet connection. Virtual globes overcome this problem with elegant engineering, using a tiling structure that sends progressively higher-resolution data as one zooms in. This and other tricks drastically reduce the size of file transfers, and allow visualization with almost zero latency on a decent broadband connection.

Scientists are already experimenting with these tools to showcase their research to the public in visually appealing ways and to speed responses to natural disasters (see pages 776 and 787). Ultimately, such accurate digital representations promise to anchor and unify much digital information about the Earth, while also helping to integrate the efforts of researchers from many disciplines.

Scientists are already experimenting with these tools to showcase their research to the public and to speed responses to natural disasters.
Rita Colwell, a microbiologist and former head of the National Science Foundation, has described GIS as the "ultimate, original, multidisciplinary language". Her own research is a shining example. Realizing that cholera epidemics spread inland from the coast, she correlated them with seasonal plankton blooms, discovering on the way that the Vibrio cholerae bacteria that cause cholera associate with gravid copepods, helping to break open their egg sacs by secreting chitinases. She went on to use remote sensing for a global predictive system for epidemics. As she has said, a major need is "to appreciate the complex reactions that characterize ecosystems — it is too complex for any one discipline".

By making it child's play to share and view multiple large data sets, virtual globes lower the barrier to entry for scientists with little GIS experience. Visualization itself can lead to new insights. Having tasted such visualizations, many researchers will be tempted to go beyond them to exploit the full capacities of GIS science to analyse vast arrays of disparate data in their spatial context.

The opportunities and power of GIS are expanding rapidly because of converging technological trends. The quality of spatial and remote-sensing data is sharply increasing in many fields, as are data-mining techniques, which can help lead to new hypotheses. Mobile global positioning system (GPS) devices are raising the prospect of collecting location-specific information quickly and cheaply, making it possible for large networks of intelligent devices to map and monitor a release of toxic gas, for example, and predict its spread.

To meet such spatial opportunities, researchers and students will need training in spatial sciences. The risks of using computational packages as 'black boxes' are well known, and are even greater, if anything, with GIS. As GIS experts have noted: "The production of visually appealing, even statistically sound, results that do not reveal anything useful about either pattern or process is perhaps the greatest danger facing newcomers to this powerful technology" (Nature Rev. Microbiol. 1, 231–237; 2003). It is therefore encouraging to note that last week the US National Academy of Sciences called for the introduction of "spatial thinking", including GIS, into school curricula, and for government research agencies to launch research into the nature of the cognitive processes involved in such thinking.

Many outstanding minds, including Einstein, Faraday, Kekulé and Heisenberg, have attributed their key insights to the ability to think spatially. Let's hope that the upcoming generation of three-dimensional gamers and Google Earthers will yield even more spatially adept prodigies ready to confront global challenges.

Google Maps API Basic Tutorial

Google Maps API Basic Tutorial: "This tutorial is intended to help you create your own interactive maps using the Google API. Do take a look at the Google documentation first.
There are two ways to use this tutorial:
Read it and try to understand the principles involved.
Use the example files as templates. Paste the code into your own web page and change the API key and data. Read the 'potential pitfalls' sections, and try to avoid them.
Using the Google Map API is not easy if you don't have much Javascript experience.
If you find the Google documentation too difficult to understand, it's not because it's badly written it's just that the subject is not easy.
I've put together some of the concepts that are explained in the Google documentation to achieve some of the basic mapping applications that might be useful.
The tutorial covers some of the standard types of operations that you may like to perform. Each of the operations is covered twice, once using 'conventional' programming techniques and once using a slightly more elegant approach that makes use of the object-oriented language features.
If you're a programming newbie, or more familiar with non-object-oriented programming languages, then I suggest that you just follow the conventional programming sections.
If you're familiar with object-oriented programming, then why not try the object-oriented approach.
Conventional programming
Part 1 Markers with info windows
Part 2 Adding a clickable sidebar
Part 3 Loading the data from an XML file
Part 4 Getting directions
Part 5 Onload functions and external controls
Part 6 Images and Links in info windows
Part 7 Loading polyline data from an XML file
Part 8 Maps in articles

Object-oriented approach
Part 1 Markers with info windows
Part 2 Adding a clickable sidebar"

Google Code: Google Earth KML Tutorial

Google Code: Google Earth KML Tutorial

The Google Earth KML Document details everything you need to know to create and share information with the Google Earth client. If, however, you would like to jump right in and see some real examples of what you can do with KML, then this tutorial is for you.

All of the examples you will see here (and many more) are in the KML Tutorial file. Download that file to see what each of the following examples looks like in Google Earth.

Tip: If you want to see what the code looks like for any feature, you can simply click on the feature, right-click and select copy, and paste the content of the clipboard unto any text editor

Table of Contents:
1 Basic KML Documents
1.1 Placemarks
1.2 Descriptive HTML in placemarks
1.3 Ground Overlays
1.4 Paths
1.5 Polygons
2 Advanced KML Documents
2.1 Custom Styles
2.2 Screen Overlays
2.3 Network Links
3 CGI Scripting for KML
3.1 Generating a Random Placemark
4 View-Based Refresh Queries
4.1 Tracking a Point Directly Under Your View
5 KML Server Requirements
1 Basic KML Documents
The simplest kind of KML documents are those that can be authored directly inside the client. That is, you don't need to edit or create any KML in a text editor. Placemarks, ground overlays, paths and polygons can all be authored directly in the Google Earth client.
1.1 Placemarks
Open the Google Earth Tutorial KML file and expand the Placemarks subfolder. There, you will see three different types of placemark: simple, floating, and tethered. The KML code for the tethered placemark looks like this:



Tethered to the ground by a customizable tail
Tethethed placemark

-122.0856375356631
37.42240551227282
305.8880792294568
46.72425699662645
49.06133439171233

0


1
relativeToGround
-122.0856204541786,37.42244015321688,50

Google Earth Community: Google Earth Community

Google Earth Community: Google Earth Community

Newbury Adds Location-Tracking Development Tools | March 20, 2006

InformationWeek Wireless Networking Newbury Adds Location-Tracking Development Tools March 20, 2006

Newbury Networks today announced an enterprise asset-tracking solution and a software development platform for emerging types of applications that incorporate location-based data from wireless networks.

Newbury’s Presence Platform integrates with WLAN infrastructure and includes a software development kit that allows users to define areas in a WLAN such as meeting rooms and offices and also allows users to set contextual guidelines for the type of content that can be accessed in these locations, according to Chuck Conley, vice president of marketing at Boston-based Newbury.

The platform works in conjunction with Active Asset, a new realtime tracking solution that uses Newbury’s Wi-Fi tags and WLAN management software to monitor the movements of items and people within an enterprise, Conley said.

Organizations that are deploying WLAN want to leverage their investments by adding customized services, Conley said. “Demand is strong for location and asset tracking, and pushing information to a device based on that information is becoming more of a need because wireless networks are becoming more ubiquitous,” he said.

Newbury’s core strength is the accuracy of its proprietary location-tracking algorithm, said Patrick Guerin, senior security analyst at Key Management Systems, a Colorado Springs, Colo.-based security solution provider.

“They have the best calibration out there and that’s important if you need to track assets with a high level of granularity,” he said.

Newbury, which has a partnership with Cisco Systems, San Jose, Calif., that allows its sensor software to run on Cisco’s Aironet 1100 and 1220 access points, expects to announce another significant deal with a major infrastructure player by mid-year, Conley said. Newbury also will be forging new alliances with other vendors to import its location technology to network ecosystems, he added.

Newbury plans to release the Presence Platform and Active Asset within the next two months. Active Asset will be priced starting at $12,995. Pricing for the Presence Platform wasn’t disclosed.

Greens loss means a pulp mill for Gunns - Business - Business - smh.com.au

Greens loss means a pulp mill for Gunns - Business - Business - smh.com.au

SHARES in woodchipper Gunns have been boosted by the end of fears that Tasmania would face a hung parliament or minority government.
Gunns yesterday rose 8c to $3.15, continuing price increases that started in the middle of last week when the market seemed to confirm expectations that the Lennon Government would be safely re-elected.
The Labor Party retained government, winning 14 of the 25 seats in the Tasmanian lower house, despite suffering a 2.3 per cent swing against it.
By contrast, the Tasmanian Greens, which had been tipped to be heading for a power-sharing role with Labor, took a battering. Following a fierce campaign where there were warnings that they would bring economic disaster on the state, the Greens now look likely to lose a seat and thus party status.
Despite the share price increase, Gunns remains the sixth worst-performing company in the benchmark ASX 200 index over the past 14 months.
With both major parties endorsing Gunns' proposed $1.4 billion pulp mill, the possibility of a hung parliament or more power to the Greens had emerged as a real threat to the company.
The group had threatened to take the mill to China if voters elected a minority government, providing Mr Lennon with handy ammunition to warn against voting for the Greens, which had been having an impact in the polls.
The mill is regarded as critical for the company's health, with analysts expecting its woodchip business to struggle until next year and timber products taking a hit due to a weaker housing market and manufacturers moving offshore. Gunns is now expected to go ahead with the pulp mill with Mr Lennon's government returned to office.

Sunday, March 12, 2006

GREENS UNFAZED BY EMRS POLL

faze Audio pronunciation of "fazed" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (fz)
tr.v. fazed, faz·ing, faz·es


To disrupt the composure of; disconcert. See Synonyms at embarrass.


[Middle English fesen, to drive away, frighten, from Old English fsian.]


fazed

adj : caused to show discomposure; "refused to be fazed by the objections" [syn: bothered, daunted]




Tasmanian Greens ...Media Release
Will Continue Strong, Positive, Grassroots Campaign Into The Last Week
The Tasmanian Greens today are unfazed by the Examiner’s EMRS Poll, saying that their feedback is they have recovered from the dip during the second week of the election campaign, around the time of the poll, and are now experiencing a swing towards them.

Greens Opposition Leader Peg Putt MHA noted that the poll shows a high likelihood of five Green seats, and said the Greens would spend the last week on a strong, positive campaign around Tasmania.

‘’The Greens are campaigning strongly with our positive vision around Tasmania, and we are unfazed by the EMRS Poll as our feedback is that we are now experiencing a groundswell of support after a small dip during the second week of the campaign,’’ Ms Putt said.

‘’Many people are telling us that they will be voting Green for the first time.’’

‘’We believe we are on track for Paul O’ Halloran to win a seat in Braddon, and whilst we have always acknowledged that a second seat in Denison is a big ask, Cassy O’ Connor is getting a great reception and we just need as many as possible to include her on their ballot paper.’’

Saturday, March 11, 2006

Greens lose support to Labor: poll. 12/03/2006. ABC News Online

Greens lose support to Labor: poll. 12/03/2006. ABC News Online

The latest Tasmanian election opinion poll predicts Labor is close to taking majority government.

The poll by the Examiner newspaper has Labor winning 11 seats, the Liberals seven and the Greens four, with three seats too close to call.

The poll has also found support for the Greens has dropped by 4 per cent

It says the swing has gone to

$8 MILLION FOR CLEAN GREEN AND CLEVER PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Tasmanian Greens ...Media Release

Biosecurity, Data logging and Small Vineyards Championed along with Quality Assurance
The Tasmanian Greens today launched their Agricultural policy and an $8 million agricultural package which sets Tasmania up to create a sustainable and secure future for all primary industry into the 21st Century. A $3 million flagship data logging project to map soils, micro-climates and current crop regimes to provide an accurate picture of Tasmania’s current situation and identify existing and emerging crop opportunities by matching specific location capability with specific production opportunities heads up the package.

Greens Opposition spokesperson for primary Industry Kim Booth MHA said that the Greens package for Tasmanian agriculture also includes $1.5 million to develop an integrated quarantine and biosecurity framework as well as funding to restablish and promote Tasmania’s HGP Free Blue Label beef programme and a special 3 point industry development package to assist small vineyards in the state.

“The Greens vision is to see Tasmania’s clean, green primary industries develop as the bedrock for a Food and Nutrition industry that will ensure career paths are developed in primary industries for young Tasmanians as well as enabling producers to make a decent living whilst staying on the land.” Mr Booth said.

“Our policy reflects the realities of a global market which demands verifiable, authentic certification of produce and this includes not only things like the chemical residue levels in food but also the growing conditions and environmental sustainability of production methods.”

“There’s no reason why Tasmania can’t be a world leader in this area.”

“Our 3 point small vineyards development package ensures that we consolidate our global market share whilst ensuring the industry gets the assistance and security of funding that will allow it to strategically plan and grow.”

“To this end we would readopt the State Cellar Door Rebate Scheme (SCDRS) and provide part funding for an Industry Development Officer as well as guaranteeing surety of funding within the DED and making a dedicated wine industry liaison officer available within that department.”

“Our policy also highlights the development of a Clean, Green Agricultural Unit within DPIWE as we are dedicated to enhancing of Tasmania’s brand Clean and Green brand whilst assisting producers into the ‘clever’ phase of marketing and production.”

“Our $200 million a year red meat industry gets it’s authentic label back with proper promotion as well as on ground inspectors to ensure retailers and exporters are selling world class product.”

“”There is also $500 000 for an expert team in vegetable marketing to identify pathways through the current crisis as well as pursue national and international markets for our producers.”

“And an initiative which I think would be a great boost to our primary producers is our $75, 000 a year International Sustainable Agriculture Scholarship which based on the Churchill fellowship scheme would see young Tasmanians selected to study internationally with a built in component of structured knowledge sharing within Tasmania on their return.”

“This package keeps the faith with our traditional industries whilst laying a pathway for careers in the sunrise agricultural industries and I am very proud to launch it today.

$8 MILLION FOR CLEAN GREEN AND CLEVER PRIMARY INDUSTRY

Tasmanian Greens ...Media Release

Biosecurity, Data logging and Small Vineyards Championed along with Quality Assurance
The Tasmanian Greens today launched their Agricultural policy and an $8 million agricultural package which sets Tasmania up to create a sustainable and secure future for all primary industry into the 21st Century. A $3 million flagship data logging project to map soils, micro-climates and current crop regimes to provide an accurate picture of Tasmania’s current situation and identify existing and emerging crop opportunities by matching specific location capability with specific production opportunities heads up the package.

Greens Opposition spokesperson for primary Industry Kim Booth MHA said that the Greens package for Tasmanian agriculture also includes $1.5 million to develop an integrated quarantine and biosecurity framework as well as funding to restablish and promote Tasmania’s HGP Free Blue Label beef programme and a special 3 point industry development package to assist small vineyards in the state.

“The Greens vision is to see Tasmania’s clean, green primary industries develop as the bedrock for a Food and Nutrition industry that will ensure career paths are developed in primary industries for young Tasmanians as well as enabling producers to make a decent living whilst staying on the land.” Mr Booth said.

“Our policy reflects the realities of a global market which demands verifiable, authentic certification of produce and this includes not only things like the chemical residue levels in food but also the growing conditions and environmental sustainability of production methods.”

“There’s no reason why Tasmania can’t be a world leader in this area.”

“Our 3 point small vineyards development package ensures that we consolidate our global market share whilst ensuring the industry gets the assistance and security of funding that will allow it to strategically plan and grow.”

“To this end we would readopt the State Cellar Door Rebate Scheme (SCDRS) and provide part funding for an Industry Development Officer as well as guaranteeing surety of funding within the DED and making a dedicated wine industry liaison officer available within that department.”

“Our policy also highlights the development of a Clean, Green Agricultural Unit within DPIWE as we are dedicated to enhancing of Tasmania’s brand Clean and Green brand whilst assisting producers into the ‘clever’ phase of marketing and production.”

“Our $200 million a year red meat industry gets it’s authentic label back with proper promotion as well as on ground inspectors to ensure retailers and exporters are selling world class product.”

“”There is also $500 000 for an expert team in vegetable marketing to identify pathways through the current crisis as well as pursue national and international markets for our producers.”

“And an initiative which I think would be a great boost to our primary producers is our $75, 000 a year International Sustainable Agriculture Scholarship which based on the Churchill fellowship scheme would see young Tasmanians selected to study internationally with a built in component of structured knowledge sharing within Tasmania on their return.”

“This package keeps the faith with our traditional industries whilst laying a pathway for careers in the sunrise agricultural industries and I am very proud to launch it today.

Wednesday, March 08, 2006

Bream Creek Show

Bream Creek Show

Rides, Ringside Entertainment, Merry Go Round, Produce, Craft, Cooking, Photography and Art Displays, Wood Chopping, Parachute Jumping, Wool Displays and Competition, Food and Local Craft Demonstrations



Admission ADULTS $6.00 CHILDREN $3.00
Bring your friends and enjoy the show!
Follow the signs from Copping

Harvest Cycle - Home

Harvest Cycle - Home

Harvest Cycle is not just a cycling event - it's a complete cycling and harvest experience like no other, for you, your family and your friends!

The combination of cycling and a productive countryside is well known to major cycling events such as the Tour de France, the Giro Italia and the Tour Down Under. Who hasn’t seen images of cyclists toiling along country roads past beautiful vineyards and fields of flowers?

Harvest Cycle celebrates the twin joys of the sport of cycling and the cycle of the harvests.

Harvest Cycle 2006 is a 3-day cycling competition open to cyclists of all ages and abilities, celebrating cycling and the cycle of Tasmania’s harvest bounty. Harvest Cycle 2006 builds on the very successful inaugural Harvest Cycle 2005, held in the Coal Valley in April 2005. Harvest Cycle 2006 will reach out to include Hobart’s fabulous Mount Wellington as the final and ultimate challenge.

Photos of Harvest Cycle 2005 are available here.

Harvest Cycle will fast become one of Australia’s iconic cycling events, with cyclists tantalised by the prospect of challenging but friendly racing amongst a backdrop of beautiful countryside, spectacular views, fantastic races routes, and gourmet food and wine. The races have been designed to bring riders, their supporters and spectators to the Coal Valley, one of Tasmania’s premier wine and fine food regions.

Harvest Cycle 2006 will comprise 5 races over a 3-day weekend. Riders will race in categories according to experience and ability. The higher categories will race longer distances. Some riders may choose to do only some of the races, depending on their experience. Expectations are for around 150 entries across 5 categories in 2006, ranging from recreational riders to elite racers.

Prizes will be awarded in each category according to accumulated points and according to accumulated time.

Pride will be awarded automatically to those who meet the challenge.








© Clive Roper



© Peter Whyte

Participants' comments from 2005
Well organised, intense and close racing - a great challenge. I was very impressed with the organisation of this weekend. This meant that all participants could just focus on the racing and what great racing it was. The crit was a real spectacle and I think the crowds enjoyed it as much as the cyclists. What a great mix of festival atmosphere, fine food and wine and great racing over achievable courses. I'll definitely be back. You did an absolutely excellent job managing the 'Harvest Cycle' events. I only entered 2 events because family commitments would only allow this. The events I was in went like clockwork and were great fun to ride. I didn't attend the extra functions or prize giving but had very good reports about them. Well done!!
The organisers need a huge pat on the back. I've organised events before and know that there are always problems/hitches, but as far as this event is concerned from the competitors and spectators perspective, it went off very smoothly. The publicity advertising the event and the information regarding each race were both superb. A mammoth task executed brilliantly with poise and good humour. Well done. There could be no complaints at all about the marshalling or anything to do with the running of the races – brilliant…it is always comforting to know someone who can cope is there looking after things. The website is excellent. The promotion material and sponsorship stuff was excellent. The races worked out well. The courses were varied and gave everyone who could climb a chance. I absolutely loved the crit course - I would do that every week!
.. the races were organised really well…everything seemed to go smoothly…we had a great time and could find no fault with anything… did a fantastic job. Fantastic organisation, wonderfully friendly competitors, most fascinating racing, especially being stage racing…looking forward to Harvest Cycle 2006! Great courses, well-planned, well-organised, great camaraderie...a fantastic weekend of cycling in a wonderful setting…

Have been involved in organising cycling events since the early sixties and observed the organisation of many top events I have competed in. the organisation of Harvest would be equal to the best. Most impressed. I haven't done anything as hard for 30 years, but very rewarding. It makes me feel like I've reinvented my youth. I went into the event with the aim to finish and I surprised myself by being competitive to the end (well almost). As a first season rider and new-comer to the sport, I had a very enjoyable 3 days of riding. The event was very well organised and safely run, the camaraderie between riders and the physical challenges made for a great long weekend - can't wait for next years event!

Extremely well organised, great experience, conviviality, friendship, challenging, competitive, fantastic scenery. An event that captured the imagination of cyclists, wine producers and the town of Richmond. These all describe the inaugural Harvest Cycle. One of the best sporting events I've participated in, in my life. Well done.



Credits: Site construction Ian Woodward. Logo and photos Peter Whyte Photographics. Site hosting sponsor Pitt & Sherry.

All photos copyright © Peter Whyte unless otherwise credited.

Bream Creek Show

Bream Creek Show: "BREAM CREEK SHOW SOCIETY INC.

HALL OF INDUSTRIES

JUDGING INFORMATION TO ASSIST EXHIBITORS

COOKERY

BREAD; No cracks or bumps, golden brown colour. Moist, tender, soft velvet texture with no taste of yeast.

LARGE and SMALL CAKES: Level or slightly rounded top, should be even and unbroken. Even golden-brown colour. No spotting. Outside should be smooth. Straight sides with no overhang. Even, fine crumb with no tunnelling. Easily cut and not crumbly, velvety texture.

SHORTBREAD: Bright appearance. Pale smooth outer surface, no crustiness. Texture fine and crisp, and even pale colour throughout.

BISCUITS: Should be small and even in size, not too thick, firm and crisp. Smooth and not broken.

SCONES: Should be well risen, with even sides and smooth top and evenly browned top and bottom. Tender crust, no flour spots or excess flour on base. Uniform in size and shape.

MERINGUES: Should be glossy, smooth and well puffed. Neither should weep or be sticky and sugary. The interior should be dry, fine and tender. Outside smooth and not broken.

LAMINGTONS: Uniform in shape and size. Icing should lightly cover-not penetrate. Coconut should be fine and clean.

PASTRY: Should be golden brown and even, all pastry should be tender and not leathery, edges should be even and unbroken. Shortcrust should be crumbly and not hard. Choux cases should be medium size and dry inside. A fatty taste is unacceptable.

SAUSAGE ROLLS: Evenly browned underneath. Base should not be undercooked and soggy. There should be sufficient meat in the roll.

SPONGE CAKES: Should be light golden brown, well risen and have good volume with no cracking or shrinking, and straight sides.

FRUIT CAKES: "

BREAM CREEK SHOW SOCIETY INC

BREAM CREEK SHOW SOCIETY INC
105th Annual Show — 18 March 2006
Hall of Industries Schedule
www.breamcreekshow.com.au
1. Show open to all; exceptions specified.
2. Entry form to be completed and mailed to Entries Secretary
no later than 11 March 2006. Section and class of each
entry to be listed individually with name, address, telephone
of exhibitor. Exhibits to be delivered to show pavilion
between 3 and 6 pm on Friday 17 March or no later than
9 am on show day. NO EXCEPTIONS!!
3. Entries prior to 11 March free of charge. Entries after 11
March 50 cents each item.
4. A label will be supplied for each exhibit and must be
attached. Unused labels must be returned to the stewards
prior to 8:45 am.
5. No single item to be entered in 2 classes, unless specified in
schedule.
6. No more than 2 items per person to be entered in each class.
7. First prize $5, second prize $2, third prize $1, except where
otherwise stated. Section prizes awarded on a highest points
basis: 9 points 1st, 6 points 2nd, 3 points 3rd and 1 point for
every other entry.
8. The judges may award prizes of less value than those fixed
by the committee, or may withhold them altogether if they
do not consider the exhibit worthy.
9. Any protest entered must be lodged before 3:45 pm with
Secretary and must be accompanied by one-third value of
prize and if deemed frivolous will be forfeited.
SECTION A - COOKERY
Section sponsored by DUNALLEY BAKERY. Memorial
Trophy for Inexpensive Fruitcake – Class 32 sponsored by
MESDAMES SPAULDING, SPAULDING AND DUGGAN.
Decorated cake – Class 30 sponsored by CORYULE CAKE
DECORATING.
Rules & Regulations
1. All items must be exhibitor’s own work.
2. All entries to be on white paper/plastic plates, small if
possible.
3. One Person’s Exhibit (see general rule 15): entrants must
indicate section and class on entry form.
4. Classes 30 and 31 are judged on appearance only.
COOKERY - Class
1. Loaf white bread.
2. Loaf wholemeal bread.
3. Bread-machine Loaf (white).
4. Plain scones (4).
5. Sweet sultana scones (4).
6. Shortbread (4).
7. Raspberry shortbread (4).
8. Plate meringues (4).
9. Muesli slice (4 pieces).
10. Anzacs (4).
11. Kiss biscuits (4, iced and jam filled).
12. Rock cakes (4).
13. Lamington cakes (4).
10. The decision of the judges shall in all cases be final.
11. The stamped entry form must be produced as proof of
identification before exhibits may be collected between 4 -
4:30 pm. Goods disposed of after 5 pm. No responsibility
taken. Section Trophies must be collected from the Chief
Steward.
12. All exhibitors must pay at the gate.
13. An exhibitor winning the same section for 5 consecutive
years will qualify for a special trophy (commenced
Bicentennial Show 1988).
14. JM DUNBABIN TROPHY for Highest Overall Aggregate
points.
15. ONE PERSON’S EXHIBIT sponsored by MR S WILSON
for a collection, one from each of the following sections: A,
E and F / Cookery, Home Industries and Flowers. Section
and class to be marked on the Entry Form.
16. All postal entries to the Entries Secretary (see above).
17. All exhibits sent by bus to: Entries Secretary c/o Copping
Roadhouse, Copping.
Please make all cheques / money orders payable to the Bream
Creek Show Society.
FAMILY MEMBERSHIP $20 — INCLUDES 2 ADULTS AND 4
CHILDREN AND ACCESS TO MEMBERS CAR PARK.
14. Cream puffs (4 unfilled)
15. Sausage rolls (4) (puff pastry).
16. Apple pie (puff pastry).
17. Old fashioned sponge cake.
18. Victoria cake (with 4 oz butter and raspberry jam filling).
19. Chocolate cake (iced).
20. Orange cake (in oblong tin and iced).
21. Sultana cake (un-iced).
22. Sponge sandwich, without butter, cream filling (un-iced).
23. Chocolate sponge, cream, filled and iced.
24. Banana cake.
25. Boiled fruitcake.
26. Plum pudding.
27. Carrot cake.
28. Marshmallow meringue (unfilled).
29. Cheesecake.
30. Decorated cake (Coryule Cake Decorating).
31. Novelty cake.
32. Inexpensive fruit cake, made from the following recipe:
6 oz butter, 2 teaspoons vinegar, ½ teaspoon almond essence,
1 teaspoon vanilla essence, 10 oz flour, 1egg, 1 cup sugar, ½
lb fruit, 1 cup milk with 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in it.
Cream butter and sugar, add egg, vinegar and fruit, then flour
and milk alternatively. Bake moderate oven 1½ hours.
33. Collection of cakes: plain, sultana and chocolate sponge.
To be one person exhibit only.
First prize $10, second prize $5, third prize $2.50.
Geoff Uebergang
President
Ph: 6253 5603
Fax: 6265 3495
Mob: 0427 876 877
Maria Woolley
Entries Secretary
406 Kellevie Road
KELLEVIE 7176
Ph: 6253 5183
Fax: 6253 5187
SECTION B - HANDCRAFTS
Section sponsored by SORELL DEPARTMENT STORE for
Knitting, ELIZABETH SEWING CENTRE for Crocheting and
POSSUM PATCH for Needlework.
Rules & Regulations
1. All items must be exhibitor’s own work.
2. Where possible label must be attached securely on articles.
3. An exhibit, which has won a prize at a previous Bream
Creek Show, may not be entered again.
KNITTING - Class (Machine-made bands allowed).
1. Adult hand knitted article (8 ply and over).
2. Lady’s hand-knitted jumper (8 ply).
3. Child’s hand-knitted jumper or cardigan (8 ply).
4. Baby’s hand-knitted jumper or cardigan (3 - 4 Ply).
5. Baby’s hand-knitted layette.
6. Baby’s hand-knitted vest (3 – 4 ply).
7. Baby’s hand-knitted bootees.
8. Hand-knitted matinee jacket.
9. Baby’s hand-knitted dress.
10. Knitted toy.
11. Doll dressed in knitwear.
12. Open class - any other knitted article.
CROCHET - Class
13. Lady’s jacket or top - knitted bands allowed.
14. Rug.
15. Baby’s dress.
16. Tea cosy.
17. Baby’s three-piece set.
SECTION C - ART AND CRAFT
Art section sponsored by YAXLEY ESTATE.
Craft section sponsored by POTTERS CROFT.
Rules & Regulations
1. All items must be your own work, and no more than 3 years
old.
2. An exhibit, which has won a prize at a previous Bream
Creek Show, may not be entered again.
ART - Class
1. Water colour painting.
2. Oil painting.
3. Acrylic painting - landscape.
4. Acrylic painting - any other subject.
5. Still life – any media.
6. Drawing - any media.
SECTION D - PHOTOGRAPHY
Section sponsored by BANGOR LANDCARE. Encouragement
Award sponsored by IAN & JENI COOK of DUNALLEY POST
OFFICE. Best overall photo sponsored by DEVIL’S KITCHEN
CAFÉ.
Rules & Regulations
1. All items must be your own work and no more than 3 years
old.
2. An exhibit, which has won a prize at a previous Bream
Creek Show, may not be entered again.
3. Maximum of 2 entries per person per class.
4. Each entry to be 1 colour or black/white photograph
mounted on A5 black cardboard (148mm x 210mm) except
classes 14, 15, 16 “collection of 4” which must be mounted
on A3 black cardboard (297mm x 420mm).
PHOTOGRAPHY—Class
1. Animals - domestic.
2. Wildlife - no manmade objects in photo.
SECTION E - HOME INDUSTRIES
Section sponsored by A & P GRAY, FULHAM.
Rules & Regulations
1. All items to be your own work, and no more than 3 years old.
2. Class number label to be on jar and on cover.
3. All entries to be named.
4. One Person’s Exhibit (see general rule 15) entrants must
indicate section and class on entry form.
18. Baby’s jacket (3 - 4 ply).
19. Cotton tray cloth, table centre or place mat.
20. Coat hanger in nylon ribbon.
21. Crocheted toy.
22. Doll dressed in crochet.
23. Novelty article.
24. Open class — any other crocheted article.
NEEDLEWORK - Class
25. Adult blouse, dress or shirt - any material, machine made.
26. Child’s dress (up to 8 years) cotton/similar, machine made.
27. Machine-made apron.
28. Any other machine-made article.
29. Article of machine patchwork.
30. Article of hand patchwork.
31. Hand and machine made patchwork.
32. Hand embroidered article.
33. Article in cross-stitch.
34. Smocked article.
35. Soft toy - any material.
36. Material made doll and dressed.
37. Novelty article using approx 1 metre of fabric.
38. Wool tapestry.
39. Article of hand appliqué.
40. Long stitch tapestry.
41. Novelty coat hanger.
42. Teddy bear.
43. Open class for stretch fabrics.
44. Open class - any other article.
7. Charcoal sketch.
8. Open class - any other media or subject.
CRAFT - Class
9. Scrapbooking – 1 twin page.
10. Doll sculpting - needle/clay.
11. Hand or wheel potteries.
12. Article in wood.
13. Article in metal.
14. Article in folk art.
15. Quilling.
16. Basketry - woven from natural fibre.
17. Article in latch-hook.
18. Punch needle rug hooking.
19. Useful article made from recycled materials.
20. Greeting Cards – collection of 3.
21. Open class - any other article.
3. Birds.
4. Seascape.
5. Landscape.
6. Scenic.
7. Rural.
8. Flora.
9. Historical.
10. Portrait - adult.
11. Portrait - child.
12. Portrait - black/white.
13. Humorous.
14. Collection of 4 with an Australian theme.
15. Collection of 4 with a marine theme.
16. Collection of 4 with a floral theme.
17. Panoramic – open (standard size 200mm x 150mm).
18. Digital – printed at home.
19. Open class.
HOME INDUSTRIES - Class
1. Collection of jams (4 varieties).
2. Fruit jelly.
3. Plum jam.
4. Marmalade.
5. Apricot jam.
6. Raspberry jam.
7. Strawberry jam.
8. Blackberry jam.
9. Cherry jam.
10. Any other jam – to be named on the jar..
11. Preserved fruit in syrup (bottle) must be Tasmanian grown.
12. Coconut ice.
13. Rum balls.
14. Any other home made sweets.
15. Chocolate sauce.
16. Raspberry sauce.
17. Bottle of tomato sauce.
SECTION F - FLOWERS
Section sponsored by THE BIGNELL FAMILY.
Rules & Regulations
1. Flowers must be grown by exhibitor, except in Floral Art.
2. Cut flowers must have own foliage and will be judged on
quality and freshness of bloom.
3. Arrangement to be 1 ½ times height of vase.
4. To use appropriate size containers, in proportion, to create
balance and harmony; no jars or bottles.
5. Floral aids can be used to support arrangement, in Floral
Art.
6. One Person’s Exhibit (see general rule 15): entrants must
indicate section and class on entry form.
CUT FLOWERS - Class
1. Container of fuchsias.
2. Container of hydrangeas.
3. Container of easter daisies.
4. Container of gladioli.
5. Container of dahlias.
6. Container of flowers, any other, one variety.
SECTION G - FRUIT
Section sponsored by GUM NUT FRUIT & VEGETABLES .
Rules & Regulations
1. All items to be grown by exhibitor.
2. All fruit to be judged on commercial value with stalks
attached.
3. There must be the correct number of items on plate per
class.
FRUIT - Class
1. Collection of apples (3 varieties, 3 of each).
2. Golden Delicious (3).
3. Red Delicious (3).
4. Jonathans (3).
5. Cox’s Orange Pippin (3).
6. Granny Smiths (3).
SECTION H - VEGETABLES
Section sponsored by MRS D JACOBSON & DAUGHTERS
as a memorial to MRS GWEN JACOBSON.
DW KINGSTON MEMORIAL Heaviest Pumpkin
Competition.
Rules & Regulations
1. All items must be grown by exhibitor.
2. In classes 1 and 2 exotic vegetables to be named.
VEGETABLES - Class
1. Collection of vegetables.
2. Newcomer’s vegetable collection. To be in cardboard box
approx. 45cm x 35cm x 20cm deep.
3. ½ case potatoes (white skin).
4. ½ case potatoes (coloured skin).
5. Largest potato.
6. Carrots - baby variety (4).
7. Carrots - long variety (4).
8. Carrots - short variety (4).
9. Largest carrot.
10. Brown onions (4).
11. White onions (4).
12. Largest onion.
18. Jar of tomato relish.
19. Bottle of chilli sauce.
20. Any other variety of relish or sauce.
21. Jar of pickles.
22. Pesto or tapenades.
23. Any variety of pickled vegetable.
24. 6 brown hen eggs – in egg carton.
25. 6 white hen eggs – in egg carton.
26. Any other variety of 6 eggs – in egg carton.
27. Jar of salad dressing/oils.
7. Container of Australian natives.
8. Container of geraniums/pelargoniums.
9. Container of herbs.
10. Best overall flowers – chosen from Classes 1 – 9 winners.
FLORAL ART - Class
11. Miniature arrangement (min 7.5cm, max 13.0 cm).
12. Christmas arrangement.
13. Arranged container of foliage.
14. Arranged container of flowers (under 30cm high).
15. Arrangement of flowers, fruit and foliage – proportion in
the order stated.
16. Mantle arrangement (frontal effect).
17. Arrangement in unusual container.
18. Creative design using 1 flower and container (foliage
allowed, but no accessories ie stones).
19. Creative design using 3 flowers and container (foliage
allowed, but no accessories).
20. Basket of flowers (no berries, but foliage allowed).
21. Dried arrangement (natural colouring).
22. Posy.
7. Fuji (3).
8. Matsu (3).
9. Democrats (3).
10. Apples, any other variety (to be named) (3).
11. Largest apple.
12. Collection of pears (3 varieties, 3 of each).
13. Packhams (3).
14. Pears, any other variety (to be named) (3).
15. Passionfruit (3).
16. Nuts (dried - to be named) (5).
17. Lemons (3).
18. Punnet of berries.
19. Plums (any variety) (3).
20. Any other stone fruit (3).
21. Any other fruit (3).
13. Parsnips (4).
14. Zucchini (2).
15. Marrow.
16. Pumpkin - yellow.
17. Pumpkin - grey.
18. Pumpkin - green.
19. Pumpkin heaviest (DW Kingston Memorial Challenge).
20. Pumpkin heaviest (grown by 10 – 16 year old).
21. Tomatoes - bush (4).
22. Tomatoes - stake (4).
23. Cherry tomatoes (punnet).
24. Beetroot - round (4).
25. Sweet corn (4).
26. Lettuce.
27. Cauliflower.
28. Cabbage.
29. Silverbeet (4 stalks).
30. Runner beans (250g).
31. Rhubarb (4 stalks).
32. Freakiest vegetable.
33. Any other variety of vegetable.
SECTION I - WINE & BEVERAGES
Section sponsored by SORELL WINE CELLARS.
Rules & Regulations
1. All entries must be made by the exhibitor.
2. Permanent labels to show only type of fruit or vegetable
from which it is made, and vintage.
3. Syrups in Class 8 must be mixed to drinking consistency
and must be named.
4. All entries to be named.
WINE - Class
1. White grape.
SECTION J - JUNIOR EXHIBITS (up to 12 years)
Infant Section sponsored by MICHAEL & JELIENA
WALKER.
Primary Section sponsored by SORELL AMCAL CHEMIST.
One Person’s Exhibit: MRS D CASIMATY for a collection of
3 items from Art/Craft, Photography and Cookery.
Encouragement award for Cookery: MRS VC WOOLLEY
MEMORIAL TROPHY.
Rules & Regulations
1. Entry free. Prize money first $3, second $2, third $1.
2. All entries must be exhibitor’s own work.
3. All section rules as for adults.
INFANT EXHIBITS (aged 6 years and under).
Classes
1. Drawing.
2. Painting.
3. Bunch of flowers.
4. Open class eg collage, french knitting, lego.
PRIMARY EXHIBITS (aged 7 years to 12 years).
COOKERY - Class
5. Chocolate cake.
6. Anzacs (4).
7. Pizza.
8. Decorated biscuits (4).
SECTION K - INTERMEDIATE SECTION (aged 13 to 18
years).
Section sponsored by BELBINS BUS SERVICES.
One Person’s Exhibit: NORTH BARKER ECO SYSTEM
SERVICES for a collection of 3 items from Art/Craft,
Photography and Cookery.
Cookery Encouragement award: CORYULE CAKE
DECORATING.
Rules & Regulations
1. Entry free. Prize money first $3, second $2, third $1.
2. All entries to be exhibitor’s own work.
3. All section rules as for adults.
COOKERY - Class
1. Chocolate cake.
2. Pizza.
3. Decorated biscuits (4).
4. Anzacs (4).
HOME INDUSTRIES - Class
5. Home made sweets.
6. Jar of jam.
HANDCRAFT - Class
7. Soft toy.
8. Machine-made article.
2. Red grape.
3. Fruit/Vegetable wine - fruit other than grapes.
4. Miscellaneous - liqueurs.
5. Home brewed beer.
6. Stout.
7. Apple cider.
8. Non-alcoholic beverage.
9. Open – any other beverage.
HANDCRAFT - Class
9. Knitted article.
10. Soft toy.
11. Article of appliqué/stitchery/beadwork.
12. Novelty Article.
ART & CRAFT - Class
13. Painting – open class.
14. Drawing - open class.
15. Article made from recycled materials.
16. Papier mache.
17. Article in clay.
18. Drawing in crayon - open.
19. Article in metal/wood.
20. Original lego construction.
21. An animal from a vegetable (no man-made accessories).
PHOTOGRAPHY - Class
22. Colour or black/white print - people.
23. Colour or black/white print - places.
24. Colour or black/white print - animals.
25. Colour or black/white print - open.
HOME INDUSTRIES - Class
26. Home made sweets.
27. Jar of jam.
28. Best presented 6 eggs in a basket.
FLOWERS - Class
29. Decorated pot plant.
30. Bunch of flowers.
9. Article of appliqué/stitchery/beadwork.
10. Novelty article.
ART AND CRAFT - Class
11. Painting of a rural scene/landscape.
12. Painting - open.
13. Drawing of a person.
14. Drawing - open.
15. Article made from clay, metal or wood.
16. Papier mache.
17. Handmade jewellery.
18. Article made from recycled materials.
19. Scrapbooking – 1 twin page.
PHOTOGRAPHY - Class
20. Colour or black/white - people.
21. Colour or black/white - places.
22. Colour or black/white - animals.
23. Colour or black/white - open.
FLOWERS - Class
24. Decorated pot plant.
25. Bunch of flowers.

Bream Creek Show

GROWING GIANT PUMPKINS

Growing giant pumpkins in Australia and throughout the World is becoming something of a craze. Giant pumpkins are very similar to grow as the smaller varieties of pumpkins but they grow a lot larger than any normal variety.

Big pumpkins have long been a highlight of the Bream Creek Show but the pumpkin world was revolutionised in the 1970s when a Canadian dairy farmer, Howard Dill, bred the Atlantic Giant. Before that, the biggest pumpkins were only a fraction of the size of the monsters of today and his pumpkin is credited with launching an international cult following – with a strong contingent turning up at Bream Creek year after year.

During the late eighties the show’s pumpkin competition became serious and the pumpkins were of such size that it took several strong men to lift them on to a ute to get them to the showgrounds. Local farmer Derek Kingston’s 90 kg pumpkin set the challenge for the years that followed and the record stands at 170kg.

We have a way to go yet though. At the Great Pumpkin Commonwealth annual weigh-off in 2002, Al Eaton, of Canada, claimed a new world record with a 657-kg monster.

So the challenge continues – are you up for it?

At the Bream Creek Show we welcome new competitors – the more stakeholders and the closer the competition the better! So, we’ll even help. Follow these instructions and you could be the proud winner of the Bream Creek Show’s legendary giant pumkin competition, possibly even a world record holder (aim high as they say!).

Giant pumkin people around the world have developed their own growing methods, and most likely the winning formulae are a secret. You may develop your own secret methods over time but for your first go, here are the basics (derived from a variety of sources and methods).

Seeds

Okay so you can’t pop along to the supermarket, pick up a packet of pumpkin seeds and expect them to turn into a wopper. You need the right variety and good breeding. There are some who claim the size potential is all in the seed - we think it’s a bit of everything really and a lot of luck but anyway…

Good genetics may well give you a heads up on the competition, so it’d be great if the seed you buy is from a known pollination (as opposed to open pollinations – i.e. pot luck), even better if it comes from a family of big ‘uns (not necessarily record breakers). Some seed sellers will provide you with a family background with your seed (a bit like papers with a pedigree pup). You may also like to check if the seed have come from plants grown in conditions similar to those of your garden.

The true competition variety - is ‘Dill’s Atlantic Giant’. 'Prizewinner', 'Big Max', or 'Big Moon' also can produce winners. Just don't plan to dish any of these varieties up with a roast - they are not much on taste and texture. They are available in Australia via mail order or online at:

Eden Seeds: www.edenseeds.com.au Freecall: 1800 188 199 Tel: (07) 5533 1107 Fax: (07) 5533 1108

Diggers Club: www.diggers.com.au Tel: (03) 59871 877 Fax: (03) 59814298

Atlantic Seeds (Giant Pumkin Specialists): www.atlanticseeds.com.au Tel/Fax: 61 3 9786 0337 Mobile: 0409 259 195

If you want to source overseas suppliers try these:


The man himself, Howard Dill (pictured here). Find him at: www.howarddill.com




This man, Don Langevin. He appears to be something of an expert and definitely an enthusiast.

Find him at: www.giantpumpkin.com He has also written a book called, “How to Grow World Class Pumpkins” if you’re really keen. He’s the one who guarantees his pollination.


Seed prices range from approximately $4 to $20 for 6, depending on where you buy, quality and breeding.

Pumpkin seeds are a delicious healthy snack. But don’t eat your seeds, you won’t win and you might grow a giant in your belly which would be most uncomfortable.

When to Plant

Giant pumpkins are usually planted around the same time of the year that smaller pumpkins are planted in your area. They do not like frost, so care should be taken to avoid the last frost, if you must plant before frosts are finished for the year, protect the young plant. Here in Tasmania and in Southern Australia, the best time to plant is October/November.

The Patch

To prepare the soil for your pumpkin patch, care should be first taken to select the correct piece of land. It should be well drained, spacious and sunny but in a wind protected area. The ground should be turned as early as possible, with manure (cow is best) or some other type of food (i.e. pea straw or similar type legume) added to give the ground nourishment and compost.

Planting

You have a couple of options here:

1) Plant the seeds in small pots (1 seed per pot) filled with a good seed raising mixture. Place the pots in a warm, sunny spot until they grow to about 2 to 3 inches high, or are in the 3-leaf stage. Then plant them carefully into your patch, leaving plenty of space between each plant – about 25 feet. The transfer process requires delicate handling of you little plant and its fragile roots.

2) Your second option is to plant the seeds directly into the ground, again about 25 feet apart.

Watering & Feeding

The most important thing when planting a giant pumpkin seed is; DO NOT OVER WATER the ground or pot until the seed has germinated (sprouted). Too much water will rot the seed. Keep the soil damp but don’t drench it.

Once you have a strong vine, water it regularly (even daily in dry weather) but again, don’t over water, especially in humid conditions. Giant pumpkins can rot very easily.

As they have a fair bit of growth to do (3.5 to 5.5 kg per day for the big mummas!), your pumpkins need weekly feeding with liquid manure or liquid compost.

Growing

A giant pumpkin takes approximately 5 months to grow - about 70 to 90 days before any fruit appear on the vine and a further 60 days or so for the fruit to reach maturity.

It is recommended that only 1-3 fruit be left on any one pumpkin bush and only one per main vine. The more fruit the more competition for food. So as the first fruit appear, select the best shaped ones and remove the others. Then pinch off any that appear later.

To become an eye-popping behemoth, your pumpkin has to grow at a good steady rate. So, do everything you can to protect its leaves. They supply nutrients to the stem of the pumpkin. If you're growing in a windy location, construct a temporary wind break, or plant some corn around your pumpkin patch to keep the plants from being damaged.

Pumpkin leaves need lots of sun, but direct sunlight on the pumpkin itself will harden its outer skin, limiting its growth. If necessary, put a shade cloth over them.

A pumpkin is mature when the skin of the pumpkin hardens off and begins to look a bit rough. The colour sometimes fades when this occurs. A giant pumpkin will only last approximately 2 months once cut off the vine, and you should never cut a giant pumpkin off the vine until it is ready for competition unless you think rot or disease may kill the fruit early if left on the vine.

GOOD LUCK AND WE’LL SEE YOU AT THE BREAM CREEK SHOW!

Entry forms available from Maria Woolley – 62535183
And while you’re at it, why not whip up a batch of your best scones, take some awe inspiring photographs or paint a masterpiece for entry into our Hall of Industries. Getting involved is a prize in itself!

Friday, March 03, 2006

QUICKER COMMUTES FOR GREEN POLITICIANS

South Arm & Franklin Electorate residents which includes Denison Green candidate Ms Cassy O'Connor must be jubilant about the Liberals promise of an upgrade to the South Arm road.

STATE LIBERAL TEAM TO EASE BOTTLENECKS AT MORNINGTON ROUNDABOUT AS PART OF THEIR $20 MILLION PLAN TO GET IT RIGHT FOR ALL TASMANIANS USING EASTERN SHORE ROADS


When your live 40 km from work --- and your voters --- you would have to be dedicated to the cause ( i.e self promotion)

POLITICIANS BEWARE ! -- feeding & supplying swill is illegal

Was that a warning to all our State politicians (and aspiring candidates) from the Government's Chief Veterinarian when commenting on a North West farmer's conviction for feeding potentially toxic substances to his pigs? He reminded us that “the penalty for swill feeding or supplying swill can be a fine of up to $10,000 or a prison sentence of 12 months or both”.

http://www.media.tas.gov.au/release.php?id=17427

Wednesday, March 01, 2006

Green light for Antarctic trial flights. 01/03/2006. ABC News Online

Green light for Antarctic trial flights. 01/03/2006. ABC News Online

Federal Environment Minister Ian Campbell says trial flights between Hobart and Antarctica should start later this year.

Work has begun on a runway to land long-range aircraft 60 kilometres inland from Casey Station.

Today in Canberra the Minister was shown one of two planes that has returned from the inaugural summer season, transporting scientists between Australia's Antarctic bases.

Senator Campbell says the air link puts Australia's Antarctic program on the brink of an exciting new era.

New marine protection areas draw wide-ranging criticism. 02/03/2006. ABC News Online

New marine protection areas draw wide-ranging criticism. 02/03/2006. ABC News Online

There is further criticism of the Federal Government's legislation to create 14 new marine protected areas in waters off south-east Australia.

Already the fishing industry is worried about losing various fisheries.

The new Fisheries Minister, Eric Abetz, says there need to be changes.

The Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS) is also unhappy.

The society says a further report by the Federal Government's own South-East Scientific Research Panel has declared the proposed system of marine protected areas a failure.

AMCS director Kate Davey says the Government wants only 3 per cent of the continental shelf and upper slope classed as no-take protected areas.

"We need to hear from the marine scientists, and many marine scientists are saying that we need to protect 20 to 30 per cent of each habitat type - of all marine habitat types in fully protected areas," she said.

Fresh food industry 'strong', report finds. 02/03/2006. ABC News Online

Fresh food industry 'strong', report finds. 02/03/2006. ABC News Online

Despite grower claims, a new report shows the vegetable industry is performing well and cheap imports are little threat.

There has been a grower-led campaign against imports, but research by the Bureau of Agriculture and Resource Economics says fresh food producers face little competition.

While suppliers of processed and packaged food have a tougher market, Karen Schneider from ABARE says in general, growers are dealing well with competition.

"The range of returns that vegetable growers are making is very similar to other parts of agriculture," she said.

"It is a strong industry now, there are areas of pressure, but overall it is a strong industry.

"There's always ongoing adjustment within agricultural industries and in other industries, so yes that will serve to strengthen the performance of the industry overall."

But there is concern that growers who supply food processors could try to sell their produce to the fresh vegetable market instead, and put their colleagues under pressure.

Mike Badcock from Ausveg says while some growers are doing well, many are just surviving.

"We've been hearing this for a long time, it is happening to a certain degree, there will be massive problems developing," he said.

"People are surviving, but they're not surviving, they're not having enough money in there to progress. Nothing stays the same, so we've got to look to the future and to our new opportunities."

Print Email

Suspected fox scats to undergo testing. 02/03/2006. ABC News Online

Suspected fox scats to undergo testing. 02/03/2006. ABC News Online

Tests will be done on animal scats from the area that a suspected fox carcass in Tasmania's north-west was found.

The fox task force is searching for signs of activity around Lillico, west of Devonport, where the carcass was found late last year.

Six members of the fox task force are searching the area for scats, a den or any other sign of foxes.

They have found animal scats in the area that will be sent for testing.

But the manager of the fox task force Chris Parker says they could be from another small animal like a cat or quoll.

"They're very similar to cats, quolls in Tasmania as well, although there's not really a very high population of quolls in that area, so they really can be any type of animal," he said.

Test results on the carcass are expected this afternoon.